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The Year of Cozy: Fruit Sugars

Desserts, DIY, Homemade


The Year of Cozy: Fruit Sugars

Today is the day! The Year of Cozy: 125 Recipes, Crafts and Other Homemade Adventures is out in the world. I hope you love it. I hope you think it’s fun and inspiring and funny and more fun.

When I set out to make this book I wanted it to be a bit different than this blog; I wanted it to be an extension, tell a slightly different story. It is just that. It’s a story about working through all the muck that is our mundane and very normal and, often times, challenging lives. It’s about controlling what you can in life because sometimes things aren’t so easy. One thing I found I could control was my thoughts, how I spent my free time and my perspective. I know this idea sounds a bit lofty and it sort of is. The inspiration came from listening to This is Water by David Foster Wallace, a life-changing listen (if you haven’t, I highly recommend it).

The Year of Cozy: Fruit Sugars

While the book’s introduction may sound a bit like, ok calm down, Adrianna, the rest of the book is happy. It’s broken up into sections: “Make,” “Live, “Do.” There are DIYs, recipes and ideas to make your day a bit sweeter.

There’s also a ton of Amelia. Hello grain-free doggie doughnuts!

Today I’m sharing a recipe for Fruit Sugars. It took me a looooong time to figure out this recipe and when I finally nailed it, I felt silly because it really couldn’t be simpler. Freeze dried fruit is pulsed in a food processor and then mixed with sugar and a teeny bit of water. As you mix the two vigorously with your fingers, the sugar will take on the fruit’s color. I think it’s beautiful.

Put this sugar in tea. Sprinkle it on cookies. Put it on all the things!!!

The Year of Cozy: Fruit Sugars

The Year of Cozy: Fruit Sugars

The Year of Cozy: Fruit Sugars

The Year of Cozy: Fruit Sugars

The Year of Cozy: Fruit Sugars

I’m not sure you know how much A Cozy Kitchen means to me. I imagine you don’t because I don’t really talk about it all that often, do I?

The whole world could be crumbling, but as long as I can bake and cook and shoot and do it with Amelia by my side and you reading, all will be ok.

This space encourages me, it inspires me, you inspire me. Thank you so much for hearing my very hormotional rant right now. Thank you for spending your hard-earned money on my book. And thank you for simply being here and reading this. I appreciate you all so very much.

xoxo
Adrianna

Links:

Order The Year of Cozy
Like my custom stamp? I got it here on Etsy!
Bowls from Suite One Studio (who made so many beautiful pieces in the book)
Listen to me on The One Plant Podcast with Jessica Murnane discussing all things The Year of Cozy (plus, she’s giving away a book! You just have to answer the question: Who do you want to cozy up with? Bowchicabowow!)

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Homemade Luxardo Maraschino Cherries

DIY, Drinks, Homemade

Homemade Luxardo Maraschino Cherries

Soo…here’s what we’re gonna do today. Ready?

We’re gonna be psychos and make Christmas presents in July. Yes. This is happening. A good first step to getting in the mood for Christmas is open up your freezer and stick your head in it. It’ll rev up your wintery engines. (That is not a euphemism, by the way, “wintery engines.”

Cherries are in full bloom right now. I was lucky enough to come across sour cherries and they are my absolute favorite. They require a bit of sugar to give them a nice balance, but not too much because I like to celebrate their tartness rather than just blast it out to oblivion.

Homemade Luxardo Maraschino Cherries

I’m sure you’ve had cheap, bright pink maraschino cherries. Perhaps you had them when your mom ordered you a shirley temple and you loved them. I was the same way.

But they have no place in my adult cocktails nor my adult banana splits. (Again, that sounds bad!)

It’s time for us to grow up and make fancy-ass maraschino cherries. This step in the right direction starts with a bottle of Luxardo liqueur.

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Superba Snack Bar’s Cocoa Pasta with Butternut Squash, Kale and Ricotta

Dinner, DIY, Homemade, How-To

How to Make Chocolate Pasta // www.acozykitchen.com

Let’s make some pasta! I was pretty excited to learn how to make chocolate pasta. I came home with a few tricks that I’d like to share because I’m an over sharer and I like you.

I’ve made pasta in the past by just rolling the dough using a rolling pin, so I know it can be done, but your arm might fall off. A pasta maker makes life sooo much easier. I used this pasta maker. Is it great? Eh…I mean, it works. And it worked pretty great, actually. I got pasta! The bonus is that it’s pretty inexpensive. Its longevity will be tested. we shall see! In a perfect world where I make homemade pasta on a weekly basis, I’d invest in this one.

The pasta begins with mixing caputo flour, cocoa powder and salt. I’d like to discuss flours for a second. Caputo flour is finer in grind compared to all-purpose. It’s actually kind of similar to cake flour in its consistency, though its protein level (about 10-12%) is similar to all-purpose flour. And since it’s made of durum wheat, it means you’ll end up with a strong pasta that isn’t very elastic-like. It’s worth seeking out for this pasta, but if you can’t find caputo flour, all-purpose will work.

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Olive Oil Granola

Breakfast, Homemade

For the past couple of weeks, I’ve been partying hardcore with butter and cheese and more cheese. You’ve been here to witness all of them, and some of you lunatics even participated. Thank you for that.

But sometimes my body needs a butter and cheese break. I didn’t make any crazy plans or goals or get on any weird diet…I just woke up on Monday morning and didn’t want a ham and cheese croissant with my coffee. CRAZY!

Instead, I walked into my kitchen, looked in the cupboards and took out all of the ingredients for exactly what my body was calling for: Olive Oil Granola.

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